Printing United Expo Student Day

Printing United Expo

PRINTING United Alliance and the Print and Graphics Scholarship Foundation
are pleased to present “Ink Your Future,” a special day dedicated to the future
of the industry being held during PRINTING United Expo on Thursday, October 20
in Las Vegas.

Students, educational institutions, and those working towards a career in
printing and graphic arts will enjoy free admission to the Expo, tours on the show
floor, the chance to meet with industry leaders and view live demonstrations of
new products and solutions, attend a special keynote presentation, and more!

More information to come, but in the meantime save the date, and grab your
spot to Ink Your Future — use code STUDENTDAY for a free pass!

REGISTER HERE


Event Agenda

9:00 am – 10:00 am — Meet and greet in Room #N232

10:00 am – Noon — Break into groups to explore show floor by interest

Noon – 2:45 pm — Students on their own to get lunch and explore the show

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm — Keynote Speaker – Joe Pulizzi – content marketing speaker, strategist, author and entrepreneur.

After the keynote, all students are invited to attend the Premier Print Awards event at the Printing United Alliance Booth!

Visit the PGSF Staff and some of the Board Directors at our Printing United Booth – N1203

For questions, contact:

Dianne Bullas, Operations Director at PGSF
diannebullas.pgsf@gmail.com | dianne.bullas@pgsf.org

 

“Stand Up and Be Recognized”

Ken Macro Blog

In my last blog, I confessed about my sadness in failing to recognize my older sister throughout my life. Born four years before me, she lived on this earth for only one week. Unfortunately, I never knew her, and consequently, I think of how my life would have been enhanced were she have grown up as my older sister. All retrospect now. But it got me thinking about identifying “the forgotten” or “the unrecognized.” Given the significant movements over the past ten years to recognize people and members of marginalized groups—and to honor their histories and the sacrifice of those in past times which have become “forgotten”—it dawned on me that, as with my sister, and, through attrition, she—as with many—were not “forgotten” but rather, “unrecognized.”

I know there were a lot of commas in that last sentence, but it is a thought stream that I wish to continue. Especially concerning the printing and packaging industry, book trades, and literary circles. Because men, generally speaking, were the predominant “recognized” source for proprietors, purveyors, and provocateurs of the printed media movement that began so prevalently in early modern Europe. However, until most recently, new revelations have been made aware pertaining to the “unrecognized” women of print from the past. 

In my last post, I mentioned a book entitled Women’s Labour and The History of the Book in Early Modern England (edited by Valerie Wayne, The Arden Shakespeare, 2022). In it, Wayne (2022) writes of the many women employed within the printing and book trades in early modern Europe. She writes, “The women who engaged in that work [printing and making books] range from those who raked rags from rubbish piles and begged door-to-door to receive pittance for them to those who ran printing houses and financed the production of books, sold them, wrote them, edited, owned, read and shared them” (2). According to Wayne, at least fifty-one widow publishers in London between 1540-1640 worked their businesses in some form or fashion. As it was in those days, the publishing house’s name most assuredly was identified by the husband or man of the family, even though the women (wives, daughters, sisters) could have very well actually been running the business, conducting production, and overseeing actual sales. Additionally, when the men associated with the printing and publishing business died, the widow would inherit the “shop” and—to earn wages for a living—would continue the operation in the name of their deceased husbands or newly acquired husbands.

One such “unrecognized” women publisher was Jacqueline du Thuit Vautrollier Field. She was the wife of a French Hugeonot who fled France for London in the 1560s. Mr. Vautrollier was a gifted and prominent printer in London at the time. He allegedly produced over 150 titles (books) over a twenty-year span. Upon his death in 1587, his wife, Jaqueline, was prohibited from printing any books under the auspices of his business name. As such, and with much persuasion to the Stationer’s Court (in London) from Mrs. Vautrollier, she was given permission to print a leaf (one page) of the Greek New Testament (which would have been an extremely challenging and difficult project). She was also granted permission to print a book based on Luther’s work on Galatians, which was apparently 600 pages in length. Later, and because of the quality of her work, she was able to obtain further publishing opportunities, printing pamphlets for members of the Royal Court of Queen Elizabeth that were in both French and English. Strategically, she decided to take on a new husband, Mr. Richard Field. In doing so, Mr. Field, a printer himself, acquired Mr. Vautrollier’s business and operated it under his name whilst providing Mrs. Vautrollier-Field with a newly recognized status within the printing/publishing community. Mr. Field was William Shakespeare’s contemporary and the first to print Shakespeare’s work. Richard and Jacqueline went on to establish a highly respected printing and publishing operation located at “The Blackfriars by Ludgate” (formerly the Vautrolliers’ Printing House) in central London well into the late 1500s. Jaqueline du Thuit Vautrollier Field, like many other “unrecognized” women of the time, was never recorded within official logs, records from controllers, or city registers. Her identity was unknown until she was courted by Mr. Field. Able to recognize her talents, he began to imprint her name on the title page (along with his own) as the official printers of applicable works.

In this series, I hope to “recognize” the names of a few of the hard-working women who have contributed expeditiously and painstakingly to building a foundation for spreading knowledge through the printing and publishing process of times past. “Research on women in book history has moved well beyond assumptions of their invisibility to imagine equally plausible alternatives for them” (10). 

Therefore, as I read this book and the many others I have acquired over the summer, it is my hope that women today, reading this blog, can appreciate the uncovering of those forgotten and invisible and—at the same time—perpetuate a continual process for bringing them forward to be affectionally and appropriately “recognized.”

Ken Macro
Professor of Graphic Communication
Cal Poly

PGSF Announces the 2022 – 2023 Scholarship Recipients

162 Stellar Students Attending 83 Schools Across the US to Benefit

View the 2022-2023 Scholarship Recipients by State / School

Pittsburgh, PA – September 05, 2022 – For the second year in a row, the Print and Graphics Scholarship Foundation has set a record in the dollar amount of scholarships given, totaling $551,000!

PGSF received over 600 scholarship applications this year. From this, the judges awarded 162 recipients with scholarships representing 83 schools from across the United States. Cal Poly and Illinois State both had 11 students receive scholarships from PGSF. At Clemson and Ferris State there were 9 recipients at each school. The average amount awarded is $3,477. This year, PGSF increased the dollar amount of the awards to help students offset the increasing costs of materials and living expenses. PGSF’s highest scholarship awarded was $12,000.

PGSF’s mission is “Building the Future of the Graphic Communications Industry”. Since 1956, PGSF has provided scholarships to full-time and part-time students attending colleges, universities, and technical schools with graphic communication-related programs. Programs include visual communications, digital printing, graphic communications, packaging, paper and printing science, apparel, web design, production management, and digital marketing. Once a full-time student receives a PGSF scholarship, it is renewable for up to four years. Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA or better and remain enrolled full-time (12 credits or more) in a graphic communication-related program.

This year PGSF awarded 114 students renewable scholarships with many worth more than $4,000.

After receiving his scholarship, Justin from Augusta Technical College wrote: “You have no clue how much this means for me having come out of a couple of rough years recently. Before college, I was graduating high school and took a year off from everything and thought that I would amount to nothing with my future. After some encouragement from my peers, I enrolled in the Fall of 2020, and I quickly regained my passion for graphic design and persevered in my first two years of college. Now, thanks to your generous gift of this scholarship, I can finish my last two semesters of college and not have any burdens of student debt because I didn’t need a handout to get me along. I EARNED MY WAY OUT OF COLLEGE!!! Peace and Blessings for all involved in PGSF, because you all change lives for the BETTER!”

“When a student is chosen to receive a PGSF award, they are not only receiving financial support for their education, but they are also joining the PGSF family and will have the benefits now and in the future of a positive support system provided by PGSF staff, directors, and our extensive alumni and contact network. We understand that life happens and work with our students to help them realize their goals,” said Dr. Debbie Bohan, Administrative Director, PGSF.

PGSF continues to find more ways to support education for the print and graphics industry. This year we expanded our funding opportunities by providing grant funding. This program funds student and instructor activities and also provides funds to acquire equipment to be used in an educational environment. Our annual student Poster and T-Shirt Competition is open to high school and college students, with winners receiving $500. The posters are used to help publicize the scholarship program. Scholarship applications for 2023-24 will open in November 2022 online at pgsf.org

Media Contact

Debbie Bohan, Administrative Director, PGSF

PGSF Announces Winners for its 2021–2022 Poster and T-Shirt Design Contest

Each contest winner receives $500 and national recognition in the graphic communications industry

2022 Poster Design Contest Winner

Pittsburgh, PA — August 22, 2022The Print and Graphics Scholarship Foundation (PGSF), a nonprofit organization working to build the future workforce of the graphic communications industry through educational scholarships, is pleased to announce the 2022 winners of its annual poster and t-shirt design contest. 

The full-time student poster winner is Emma Kostick, an upcoming senior at Appalachian State University in North Carolina. 

“I am very honored to receive this award, and it has inspired me to keep pushing toward my career goals in graphic design. I hope I can inspire others like me to gain the confidence they need in order to reach their dreams and desired goals,” said Emma.2022 Poster Design Contest Winner

The part-time student poster winner is Joshua Burgos from Camden County Technical Schools in New Jersey. 2022 is the second year a student from CCTS has won the contest.

 

The t-shirt contest winner is William C. Glass of West Hall High School in Oakwood, Georgia, class of 2023. Will comments, “I was diagnosed with high-functioning autism with Asperger’s Syndrome, and my gift is in graphic art and design. I want to study and learn new techniques to develop and produce fresh and exciting graphic art and design. Being surrounded by art and being a part of the creative process is my happy space.”

PGSF 2022 T-Shirt Design Contest Winner Will Glass

“Will has always been creative and highly involved in our West Hall High School Spartan print shop,” comments Caitlin Hickey, Glass’ graphic design teacher at West Hall High School. “I’ve had the pleasure of teaching him for two years now, and his design skill set has grown exponentially. Winning this competition and learning about PGSF has been incredibly beneficial for his future. We are so proud of him!”

Each contest winner receives $500 from PGSF. These funds benefit full-time students pursuing a career in graphic communications as well as employees currently working in the industry looking to obtain financial assistance to enroll in part-time classes and advance their careers. The t-shirt and posters will be produced and available at the 2022 Americas Print Show and Printing United. We will also showcase these throughout the year to promote scholarships available.

“PGSF would like to thank and acknowledge the high school and college educators from all over the country who include the poster and t-shirt competition in their lesson plans every year,” said Dianne Bullas, Director of Operations for PGSF.

Information on the 2022/23 PGSF poster and t-shirt competition will be emailed this fall and posted on the PGSF website. 

For information on scholarships, contests, grants, and ways to donate, visit www.pgsf.org.

About PGSF

The Print and Graphics Scholarship Foundation is a not-for-profit, private, industry-directed organization that dispenses assistance to talented youth interested in graphic communications careers and pursuing education at technical colleges and universities. The mission of PGSF is to promote the graphics industry as a career choice for young people and support them through their education process. 

For More Details Contact: Dianne Bullas, Director of Operations | dianne.bullas@pgsf.org

“Happy Father’s Day, Becky!”

I remember in 1974 when my brother was born, how excited my father was at the time. It was important to him that the Macro name continue in perpetuity and birthing two sons—as my father and mother had—was imperative to maintaining the lineage of a waning familial name. 

Truth be told, my father came from a family of four (three brothers and a sister) of which he lost an older brother to a childhood disease and another to World War II. And then to be raised by his oldest sister. A fantastic independent Italian woman, I remember her unrivaled kindness and generosity. She made the most incredible raisin-filled cookies. 

As a father myself, my wife and I have raised three sons. As life continued, we watched our family grow to include two grandsons and miraculously—over COVID—my oldest son and his wife gave birth to a little granddaughter. That said, my youngest brothers (I have a half-brother from my father’s second marriage) both have sons. So, it would go without saying that our family (until 2020) was destined to bring boys into this world. I would often lament that our family has not seen a Macro girl for over three generations. 

But I stand corrected. 

I failed to recognize that my mother and father gave birth to a baby girl in the early sixties, who lived for only a week. Her name was Becky. She was born prematurely as my mother was a Type I diabetic and—at the time—the combination was proven to be complicated due to the lack of medical advancements available at the time. Becky would have been my sister, the oldest sibling of my immediate family. 

I tell you this story, especially on the eve of Father’s Day 2020, to pay homage to her. I had forgotten her having never met her. Although she has a grave marker to remind us of her past, life’s progressions have rendered her memories limited to those who had the opportunity to experience her very short life. I often think about how my life would have been changed had she been exposed to the advancements in medicine that we have become accustomed to today. I think about all the advice she could have extended to me amongst the many questionable decisions I made throughout my life (like taking a semester off to sell grandfather clocks at the Wyoming Valley Mall). 

So, to all women out there who have been forgotten, who have made unrecognized contributions to the world—albeit small or grandiose—I salute you. And, I salute Becky. 

PGSF BLOG Womens Labour Book CoverAs this blog is in recognition of everything Graphic Communication, I was so moved by a recent book I acquired entitled Women’s Labour and The History of the Book in Early Modern England (edited by Valerie Wayne, The Arden Shakespeare, 2022). It is a compilation of essays that explore the roles of women in printing, publishing, papermaking, bookbinding, and book collecting alike. Dr. Wayne and her esteemed colleagues provide significant historical research into identifying the lost women who were integral to the purveyance of the printed book within the Early Modern Era in both England and the United States—intriguing stories of oppression, dedication, craftsmanship, and entrepreneurialism—unrecognized within the annals of history. 

In my next blog, I will introduce you to a few of these interesting women who established presses or continued the production of book manufacturing in a time reserved only for men. 

I can only imagine that my sister Becky would have made her own contributions to our ever-changing and reconditioning world. But I must first begin simply by recognizing Her, so that her memory is not lost to me, my family, or the world–for that matter. 

Happy Father’s Day Becky. And to all women who have helped preserve knowledge, may the book continue to be written. 

Ken

PGSF Announces Retirement of Bernadine Eckert

Managing Director is being honored with a new Endowment

Pittsburgh, PA — September 20, 2022Bernadine (Bernie) Eckert, long time Bernie EckertManaging Director of the Print & Graphics Scholarship Foundation (PGSF) will be retiring in December 2022. Bernie has worked tirelessly for over 20 years managing the scholarship process for thousands of students who are working on furthering their education in the Graphic Arts. She will be greatly missed by her team at PGSF as well as by the students, faculty and the PGSF board.  

“It has been a privilege to work with Bernie and see firsthand how she has positively impacted so many people,” said Ted Straus, PGSF Board member and President /CEO of Suttle-Straus. “PGSF has truly benefitted from Bernie’s passion and dedication to the organization. Thank you, Bernie, for everything that you have done for PGSF!”

To honor Bernie’s extensive career with PGSF, an endowed scholarship in her name has been established. This will ensure that her memory endures for years to come throughout the Graphic Arts Industry, offering financial aid to students entering the Graphic Arts industry. The goal is to have it fully funded by the time she leaves the foundation in December 2022. 

PGSF calls on industry professionals, companies and others who might be alumni, previous scholarship recipients, and those who have benefited from the tireless work Bernie gave to the foundation to donate towards this effort. If you have hired previous scholarship beneficiaries or look to add younger individuals to your staff in the future, this is one-way organizations and individuals can show support and level up the opportunities into the future.  

The PGSF Staff and Board of Directors is honored to welcome donations of any size. This will ensure that her passion, enormous efforts, and Bernie’s name will continue in perpetuity to the benefit of students annually. 

To encourage participation, a generous benefactor has stepped up to match every $100 donation made in the fall of 2022 to help achieve required endowment levels.

Donations can be made at PGSF.org or by going directly to the Bernie Eckert Endowment PayPal page.  Those who would like send a check can mail it to the attention of Jeff White. PGSF Development Director, PO Box 15348, Pittsburgh PA 15237. Please note in the memo section that it is for Bernie’s Fund. You can also scan the QR code with your phone to learn more and donate.

Bernie Eckert Endowment Fundraising QR Code

About PGSF

The Print and Graphics Scholarship Foundation is a not-for-profit, private, industry-directed organization that dispenses technical and college scholarships and assistance to talented youth interested in graphic communication careers, as well as current employees in the industry. The mission of PGSF is to promote the graphics industry as a career choice and to support students through their education process.

Contact:

Jeffrey White
Director of Development
412-608-2855
jeff.white@pgsf.org

www.pgsf.org

PGSF to Participate at Two Industry Events: Americas Print Show and Printing United

Pittsburgh, PA — June 8, 2022The Print and Graphics Scholarship Foundation (PGSF) is pleased to announce that it will be participating at two upcoming industry events: the Americas Print Show, taking place August 17-19 in Columbus, OH, and Printing United, October 19-21 in Las Vegas, NV.

Americas Print Show '22

At the Americas Print Show, PGSF will be at the workforce development area, booth 1741. The non-profit will be involved in the Student Day, Thursday, August 18th, which will include a tour of FSC-certified Hopkins Printing for educators, students, and their families. Printing United Expo

A similar tour is planned during Printing United, where PGSF will be at booth N1203. 

“We look forward to meeting with the community at the upcoming expos,” comments Dianne Bullas, Operations Director, PGSF. “As the print industry evolves, and products such as wall décor, carpets, and clothing are produced in addition to magazines and packaging, there is a career path opportunity for almost everyone. The industry is fueling jobs in finance, human resources, mechanics, IT, customer service, sales, marketing, safety, logistics, press operators and technicians, and more. It’s a great industry for learning and advancement.”

For more information, visit www.PGSF.org.

 

About PGSF

The Print and Graphics Scholarship Foundation is a not-for-profit, private, industry-directed organization that dispenses technical and college scholarships and assistance to talented youth interested in graphic communications careers. The mission of PGSF is to promote the graphics industry as a career choice for young people and then to support them through their education process. 

 

Contact:

Jeff White

Director of Development, PGSF

jeff.white@pgsf.org

412-608-2855

We are On Air!

 

 

 

 

 

Jeff White, Director of Development at PGSF, and Joe Lyman, CEO of GLGA, join Deborah Corn to discuss aiding long-term student success, exciting new school programs and grants, exposing younger generations to the magic of the print industry – and how you can help!

Listen to this episode by searching for Podcasts From The Printerverse on your preferred podcast platform.

OR visit: https://podcasts.printmediacentr.com/supporting-students-with-jeff-white-pgsf-and-joe-lyman-glga/