“Happy Father’s Day, Becky!”

I remember in 1974 when my brother was born, how excited my father was at the time. It was important to him that the Macro name continue in perpetuity and birthing two sons—as my father and mother had—was imperative to maintaining the lineage of a waning familial name. 

Truth be told, my father came from a family of four (three brothers and a sister) of which he lost an older brother to a childhood disease and another to World War II. And then to be raised by his oldest sister. A fantastic independent Italian woman, I remember her unrivaled kindness and generosity. She made the most incredible raisin-filled cookies. 

As a father myself, my wife and I have raised three sons. As life continued, we watched our family grow to include two grandsons and miraculously—over COVID—my oldest son and his wife gave birth to a little granddaughter. That said, my youngest brothers (I have a half-brother from my father’s second marriage) both have sons. So, it would go without saying that our family (until 2020) was destined to bring boys into this world. I would often lament that our family has not seen a Macro girl for over three generations. 

But I stand corrected. 

I failed to recognize that my mother and father gave birth to a baby girl in the early sixties, who lived for only a week. Her name was Becky. She was born prematurely as my mother was a Type I diabetic and—at the time—the combination was proven to be complicated due to the lack of medical advancements available at the time. Becky would have been my sister, the oldest sibling of my immediate family. 

I tell you this story, especially on the eve of Father’s Day 2020, to pay homage to her. I had forgotten her having never met her. Although she has a grave marker to remind us of her past, life’s progressions have rendered her memories limited to those who had the opportunity to experience her very short life. I often think about how my life would have been changed had she been exposed to the advancements in medicine that we have become accustomed to today. I think about all the advice she could have extended to me amongst the many questionable decisions I made throughout my life (like taking a semester off to sell grandfather clocks at the Wyoming Valley Mall). 

So, to all women out there who have been forgotten, who have made unrecognized contributions to the world—albeit small or grandiose—I salute you. And, I salute Becky. 

PGSF BLOG Womens Labour Book CoverAs this blog is in recognition of everything Graphic Communication, I was so moved by a recent book I acquired entitled Women’s Labour and The History of the Book in Early Modern England (edited by Valerie Wayne, The Arden Shakespeare, 2022). It is a compilation of essays that explore the roles of women in printing, publishing, papermaking, bookbinding, and book collecting alike. Dr. Wayne and her esteemed colleagues provide significant historical research into identifying the lost women who were integral to the purveyance of the printed book within the Early Modern Era in both England and the United States—intriguing stories of oppression, dedication, craftsmanship, and entrepreneurialism—unrecognized within the annals of history. 

In my next blog, I will introduce you to a few of these interesting women who established presses or continued the production of book manufacturing in a time reserved only for men. 

I can only imagine that my sister Becky would have made her own contributions to our ever-changing and reconditioning world. But I must first begin simply by recognizing Her, so that her memory is not lost to me, my family, or the world–for that matter. 

Happy Father’s Day Becky. And to all women who have helped preserve knowledge, may the book continue to be written. 

Ken

Gravure AIMCAL Alliance – February Newsletter

The Gravure AIMCAL Alliance is a partner in all things PGSF. We are pleased to share some highlights from their February 2022 Newsletter, featuring College Outreach, Career Days, and More!

Read all here https://gaa.org/news/

Keeping the Printing/Converting Industry as a viable career option for the next generations!

University and College Gravure Day: This program helps students understand all the industry segments that use the Gravure process and provides awareness of all the careers in printing and converting. Interested in holding a “Gravure Day?” Email info@gaa.org, subject line: “Gravure Day.”

Clemson GC Spring 2022 Internship & Career Fair

The Graphic Communications Department will be hosting its next, twice-annual Internship & Career Fair on March 7-8 at Clemson University. If you have an upcoming internship or full-time position to fill, this is a great opportunity to get in front of more than 200 graphic-arts students, and the graduating class at a reception the evening before the main event, to recruit top talent.

Internships & Careers (clemson.edu)

Career-Snapshots Helping Students with Career Discovery.

Career-Snapshots www.career-snapshots.com is a tool that came out of necessity from the COVID-19 pandemic to give high-school students a way to virtually do career exploration and awareness. Mike Realon, Career & Community Development Coordinator at Olympic High School in Charlotte, NC, working with industry volunteers, built the Career-Snapshots tool. The site has received 2.3 million hits since its launch one year ago. The link was spread through the CMS school district and is being passed across the Carolinas and beyond.

In an effort to promote careers in printing/converting and related industries, the Gravure AIMACL Alliance and other associations were asked to invite members to contribute a video. A career video is simply a way to tell students how you found your career, how you learned (apprenticeship, certificate, degree), why you like it and a potential salary range. There are easily 10 careers associated with printing/converting (Prepress, Graphic Design, Production, Inks/Substrates, Finishing, Inspection, Package Design, and so on.) Please visit the CS and pass it on. If interested in contributing a video, go to www.career-snapshots.com, click the “Contribute” tab or email tdoanto@gaa.org.

Endowment History – The Madeline Gegenheimer McClure Scholarship

The Madeline Gegenheimer McClure Scholarship

Established 1978

Madeline Gegenheimer McClure Scholarship EndowmentMrs. McClure, a former member of the board of directors of Baldwin
Technology Corporation, spearheaded the advancement of graphic arts
education programs. In 1985, Mrs. McClure contributed a sizable gift to the NSTF program, thereby establishing a permanent endowment in her name.

Funds are provided through the endowment to assist students in pursuing Careers in the graphic arts. Sons and daughters of Baldwin employees are considered first. If no suitable candidates are presented, funds may be used in support of a graduate fellowship in graphic arts research. If no graduate students in graphic arts research apply, awards are made to any qualified graphic arts student.

The Madeline Gegenheimer McClure Scholarship is part of our Gutenberg Society which is comprised of members that have made a gift commitment of $100,000 or more. To learn more about all of our endowed scholarships go to our updated online book. Learn more about the opportunities and benefits of creating an endowment with PGSF on our Endowments page. More questions – contact the PGSF Director of Development, Jeff White

I’m Not Anyone – A Story of Reinvention and Acceptance

Roger Gimbel, who served on the PGSF board for many years and has an endowed scholarship with PGSF, has just published I’m Not Anyone – A Story of Reinvention and Acceptance, a paperback book available on Amazon.  Generously, Roger is donating all of the proceeds from the sale of this book to PGSF.  Below is the synopsis – purchase your copy today and support the foundation!

Buy on Amazon NOW

FROM THE BACK COVER

PGSF Gimbel

Roger P. Gimbel, EDP is a well-known entrepreneur and business executive in the commercial print industry. He assumed management of the family business, Gimbel & Associates, expanded it, and had it taken from him. Over the course of his career, he’s experienced many ups and downs; some of them humorous, others heart-breaking.

I’m Not Anyone is the colorful story of a man who endured a big business disappointment, regained his sense of worth, and became an innovative and inspiring influencer.

The book is filled with interesting anecdotes and provides a glimpse into the evolution of the printing business from the 1960s until today.

ADDITIONAL NOTES

This book covers over 50 years in the life of Roger P. Gimbel, EDP. He’s now the president of consulting firm Gimbel & Associates, but he started his business career working in his father’s print shop. The events that steered his life, and sometimes changed his trajectory, are related in “I’m Not Anyone” through amusing and interesting anecdotes and stories.

Coming of age in the turbulent late sixties had an influence on Roger’s life as he attempted to balance his interest in becoming a successful business executive with the counterculture attitudes of the time. He managed to start and expand his company while simultaneously enjoying life to its fullest. Readers will learn how he foresaw an increase in demand for quick-turnaround duplication and copying and set up his business to take advantage of new technology in the printing industry, eventually running operations for the family printing company following his father’s death.

Success and a growing reputation attracted business from big enterprises like JC Penney and AT&T. Demands for rapidly produced high volumes of print inspired Roger to work with his contacts at industry-leading vendors like Xerox to develop or evaluate new technology sorely needed in the world of printing. Things were going well. Then he made a decision that seemed right at the time but eventually caused him to leave the print production business. With no Plan B, Roger Gimbel had to reinvent himself on the fly.

Interspersed with a digital printing chronicle are stories about sailing, reality TV, unscrupulous business associates, celebrities, and even gangsters! Readers will learn about the print industry’s evolution while being entertained by Roger’s stories and adventures.

Personal development, drive, and ambition are also part of the story, all wrapped in tales of business trends and developments. Anyone interested in the printing business will enjoy this book, but it also appeals as an engrossing biography of one of the most interesting people in any industry.

CLICK HERE to purchase on AMAZON!

 

Endowment History – The Charles and Myrtle Wood Memorial Scholarship

The Charles and Myrtle Wood Memorial Scholarship

Established 1992

Charles and Myrtle Wood

The Charles and Myrtle Wood Memorial Scholarship was established through the instructions of their will and upon their deaths. Charles was the president of Charles R. Wood and Associates in San Francisco, California.

Charles entered the printing industry in 1920. He worked with the greatest of the pioneer photo lithographers, Ellis Bassist. He then went to San Francisco and completed his apprenticeships at Schmidt Lithograph Company as a pressman and photographer. In 1935 he started his own company and donated his services and his plant on weekends for training the air force map reproduction company after the war began. After returning from the war, his company prospered for over twenty years; then he sold it to Schmidt Lithograph Company but remained as Vice President of Production.

Wood established an enviable reputation on the West Coast for high quality and innovation in printing. His company installed the first and only sheetfed gravure press in the region to satisfy his desire for even finer quality reproduction. 

The Wood Memorial Scholarship will continue to honor the memory and dedication of Charles, by providing funds to assist students pursuing careers in graphic communications and printing technology.

The Charles and Myrtle Wood Memorial Scholarship is part of our Gutenberg Society which is comprised of members that have made a gift commitment of $100,000 or more. To learn more about all of our endowed scholarships go to our updated online book. Learn more about the opportunities and benefits of creating an endowment with PGSF on our Endowments page.

More questions – contact the PGSF Director of Development, Jeff White.  

Endowment History – The William Krueger Scholarship

The William Krueger Scholarship

Established 1981

William Krueger Scholarship

Mr. Krueger established the William Krueger Scholarship to give students a chance to further their education, especially in the printing field. His father, William Krueger I, was the founder of Krueger Printing Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

1n 1934, Krueger bought out Standard Printing Company in Racine, which was started by Harry Quadracci, Sr. Harry became co-founder and together they started the W.A. Krueger Company in Milwaukee. The company continued to grow. They built plants in Brookfield, WI; Phoenix, AZ; New Berlin, WI; Senatobia, MS; Jonesboro, AR; and Pontiac, IL. During the 80’s W.A. Krueger bought the W.F. Hall Company of Chicago and merged with Ringier of Switzerland.

Mr. Krueger gave “Living Gifts” to the Milwaukee School of Engineering for the printing department that bears his name. He also provided several grants to Marquette University for scholarships and the lounge in the Memorial Union building. In 1991, he gave a grant to the printing hall of Chowan College in North Carolina

He has served as President of the Printing Industries of Wisconsin. He served on the Board of the Graphic Arts Technical Foundation and the National Association of Photo Lithographers and was a member of the GATF Society of Fellows. Mr. Krueger was also instrumental in establishing the Education Council of the Graphic Arts. 

The William Krueger Scholarship is part of our Gutenberg Society which is comprised of members that have made a gift commitment of $100,000 or more. To learn more about all of our endowed scholarships go to our updated online book. Learn more about the opportunities and benefits of creating an endowment with PGSF on our Endowments page.

More questions – contact the PGSF Director of Development, Jeff White.

“Hey, I want to be included!”

Diversity of Students Around Table

By: Ken Macro, PhD

California Polytechnic State University, Graphic Communications

First, I wish to apologize for my hiatus this past couple of months. The wacky world of education coupled with, well, the wacky world challenged time, which took its toll.

But I am back and full of (among many things) new ideas.

As with most educational institutions and progressive thinking organizations, the landscape regarding diversity, inclusivity, and equity remains prominent. With this relatively new social outlook, faculty, students, leaders, employees, and the public as well are engaging in discussions that bring such subjects to light. Most recently, I helped facilitate a departmental DEI event for our student constituency. It was hosted by a trusted professor within our department and included other guest panelists from the department including another faculty member and two students who closely represent the backgrounds of our student constituency.

Diversity equity inclusion

The event was held during an evening in February, and it was held as a face-to-face event (masked, of course) with two guest speakers who “Zoomed” in on the screen. The attendance was around 25 students, four faculty from the department, and three guests from industry who also serve on our departmental advisory board.

One question that was posed to the panel and speakers was, “what frustrates you today with regards to inclusivity?” One of the panelists responded, “I don’t like that companies within our discipline are not open to having these discussions openly and are afraid to listen to younger generations about their interests, social causes, and progress towards change. I just don’t feel as though I belong, or, will ever?”

I think this sentiment strikes a loud bell for us all. In keeping with my WWWdWD theme, Wynkyn De Worde understood this as well. An immigrant from France (Alsace), De Worde, most likely fluent in French, German, and Flemish, immigrated to England to set up the first press of London with William Caxton. Upon Caxton’s death in the late 1400s, de Worde inherited Caxton’s shop for which he moved to the now famous Fleet Street in London. As an immigrant, he was restricted in business activities so as not to reduce the opportunities for “local and native” printers to receive jobs. And, he would certainly not have been considered or commissioned for any Royal commitments due to his immigration status. He knew, first-hand, what it was like to be treated as an outsider and to be excluded from the dominating community. Because printing was still rather evolving at this time, he was able to obtain work from Royal suitors, members of the elite, clergy and academics alike, however, he also took his work to the common people and translated content that was most appealing to them in a language they could understand.

I think the big lesson here is that companies and organizations should do the same. When recruiting younger generations, they should take great efforts in listening to them, learning from them, and including them. As our industry changes, so do the people. But this change cannot be productive nor progressive unless everyone is included. How are you engaging diversity, inclusivity, and equity within your organization?

WWWdW do? He would say put aside put on a serious face and actively engage in serious conversations with the younger generation, or you will find that your company will want to be included.

Ken

Should you have questions on how to establish a DEI initiative within your organization, feel free to contact me. I would be excited to assist.

“Ding, Ding!”

Having turned in my grades for the past quarter (Fall 2021), I do so with great expediency in that it was a challenging and arduous experience. As many schools reconvened “in person” at the end of August, the lurking and dismal continuously-ringing tone of COVID and Zoom Lectures kept heightened awareness of the complexities of classroom logistics and dynamics. It brings new meaning to the term tintinnabulation (a continuous ringing in the ear).  

Challenged with a large college Freshman introductory course in Graphic Communication, I decided to ease the burden of class attendance by providing a F2F (face-to-face) lecture subsidized with an online ZOOM live simulcast. This offered an option for those who wished to remain in the confines of their homes and not within the assigned lecture hall auditorium. Exhausting as this exercise was (I get quite animated in my lectures), I attempted to entertain the F2F students (albeit without the opportunity to read expressions from their faces) while simultaneously engaging students ZOOMing in for the online lecture (not being able to see their condensed on-screen faces). And doing this while gasping behind a mask and/or face shield for the assigned time and talking in front of me, then turning behind to speak to the computer located directly behind me.

What I found most interesting was that most of the students came for the F2F lectures while a quarter of the class lurked online. I stopped several times during my lecture to ask if students would have been easier and more convenient to have offered the course online exclusively, to which I received a resounding “no .” I was intrigued because many faculty members believed that the student constituency preferred online class offerings. Side note – our University held a hardline on the decision to come back and teach F2F, but there was some dissension amongst the masses).

In many challenging and tiring situations requiring decision making, change, and redirection, I think, once again, of our good friend Wynkyn de Worde (WWWdWD). When many printers in Europe were busy chasing, acquiring, and translating manuscripts about theology, science, and classics within the humanities, Wynkyn went with what he knew best, the public. And, as such, began to publish books that appealed to the public. Not an educated aristocrat, but a highly talented printer, he was the first to publish “how-to” guides to better educate his community. He learned this by being embedded within his community, stimulating dialog, and inquiring first-handedly. I always imagine a bell sounding off in his printshop store-front as many of his friends, authors, educators, clients, and residents walk through the door to say hello or engage in stimulating conversation—that is to say—face-to-face.

If you want to know what is best for the people you serve, simply ask them. As a society, we cannot continue to live confined to our Zoom Rooms (it worked when we needed it to). We must face the incessant tintinnabulation and listen to Wynkyn to understand and serve our communities and customers.

I hope your holidays are warm and fulfilling, and, more importantly, I wish you all a sane, healthy, productive, and rejuvenating New Year.

Ding! Ding!

Ken